‘Gentleman’ and ‘nice’ GPs: How they’ve won the hearts of patients with mental health problems

From the first moments of her life, Kate, now 43, suffered from mental health difficulties.

Her father was diagnosed with schizophrenia at the age of 14, and her mother with bipolar disorder.

“I had a really hard time at school,” Kate told BBC News.

“It was so hard for me to be in the classroom.

“I’d always think: ‘I’ll just be happy when I’m not in the room.'””

It was really difficult when my mum and father were struggling with mental illness. “

I’d always think: ‘I’ll just be happy when I’m not in the room.'”

It was really difficult when my mum and father were struggling with mental illness.

I’m the youngest, but I’ve had some really hard times with my mum, too.

I’d just been a teenager.

I would think: How could she do that?””

Then I’d see her sitting in her office with a bottle of water and she’d just be looking at it.

I would think: How could she do that?”

The doctor who diagnosed her told her: ‘Your brain is like a bell.’

It’s like a pendulum.

It swings up and down.

It has to stay up or it falls down.

She’s also been on medication and has undergone regular appointments with a psychiatrist and a specialist psychiatrist.”

Kate has now been through a series of intensive psychological and psychotherapy sessions.

She’s also been on medication and has undergone regular appointments with a psychiatrist and a specialist psychiatrist.

She said: “When my mum was diagnosed, I just had to accept that she was going to have to go through this.

I think it was the first time in my life I’d ever felt that kind of support.

“And I’ve never been so happy for someone I’ve felt so sorry for.”

Kate said her dad had been diagnosed with bipolar disease, but she didn’t think that made him a danger to himself or others.

“He was just a really nice man,” she said.

“I knew he was just as unhappy as me.

I had this big smile on my face, but he didn’t see it.”

Kate says her experience helped her cope with her own mental health challenges and she was able to find solace in her family.

“You can’t see the good in anything,” she told BBC Radio 4’s Today programme.

“You can see the bad, but you don’ t see the positive.”

Glamour gymnastics: A look back at some of the stars who’ve helped make it glamorousThe BBC is running a series called ‘Glamours’, which will feature inspirational stories from the past year of British sport.

Kate has shared her story of resilience with the show, which is being filmed for the first series.

“When you have a mental health problem, you can feel trapped,” she says.

“It’s very hard to know how to make it through.

So it was really important for me, because I wanted to make sure people didn’t feel trapped.”Read more:

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